11.7.19

Home Adaptations For Older People


When the time comes that an elderly relative moves into your home, there are many changes to consider when you're updating a home to be elderly friendly. A home can be a dangerous place when it's not altered properly to suit, from dimly lit hallways causes hazards, to having bathroom fixtures so they can have their own bit of dignity.

It's hard to step into the new world of having to care for an adult, when you're not used to it. Sometimes your home just isn't set up in the right way as it's ideal to have a single storey abode so an elderly person can easily get around - this isn't always possible though. And this means working some adaptations into your home to make it accessible. 

Get Help
It's not always possible to do everything yourself, especially when some things need to be done safely. You could check out the CHC checklist for funding and free care to see if you'd be eligible for continuing healthcare funding for NHS-funded nursing care. This would not only give you peace of mind as they're getting that extra help that is needed, but also could help with giving the relative some dignity when it comes to their healthcare needs. 

Get Adaptions
Grab rails can be a big help, to hold onto and prevent the elderly from falling, so putting these around the bathroom, and anywhere they may be for significant amounts of time will really help. These can be in the bathroom, hallway, on the stairs, and even outside. 

Get The Flooring Right
You wouldn't think that this was a big problem, but when it comes to safety issues, wooden flooring can be slippery, especially when wet, and neatly placed rugs can be a trip hazard. Try to remove anything that could make an elderly person trip. And try to keep cables and wiring off the floor and out of the way too. 

The Bathroom Is So Important!
The bathroom sometimes gives people that last little bit of independence so it's important to make this accessible. It's also a good idea to signpost the bathroom door so that it can be distinguished easily. Or you could also install a wet-room, or walk-in-shower, so that there's no trip hazards and the relative can easily use the bathroom without help. 

Adaptations don't have to be big and pricey. It's just a case of going around your home and working out where they may need that little bit of help to be able to have that bit of independence. 

8 comments:

  1. Makes a massive difference - would love to get rid of our rug as I always fear dad will trip !

    ReplyDelete
  2. First of all I want to thank you for sharing this wonderful post here. You have explained each of them in a very detailed manner. You have a good writing skill. I like your post very much. I can say that this is one of the best posts I liked in your blog. This is one of the very important posts one should read it without failing. In everyone’s home there may be one or two elderly persons. You must take care of them carefully. When they are getting old they need more care from you. You have described many important points here. It is very much interesting to read such post. If you have a disability or someone close to you have then it is important to read this post. A visual, hearing or motor impairment will certainly require some adjustments to be able to continue a normal life, at home, in a safe and suitable environment.

    With age, the answer is at first sight less obvious. And yet ... Each year, nearly 450,000 people over 65 fall at home. It is the leading cause of accidental death among seniors. And even a "simple" injury can have serious physical and psychological consequences for an elderly person.
    But the main causes of these falls (when they are not linked to the person himself) are often very trivial, and frankly avoidable: objects on the ground, poor lighting, slippery floor, carpet poorly fixed, poorly marked steps ... As many obstacles as the adaptation of the home will just overcome.
    In general, the bathroom is considered one of the priority projects: installing grab bars, a shower seat, non-slip mats and of course bright lighting is common sense tips.

    The kitchen is where 25% of accidents occur in everyday life. And the stairs are then to be treated in stride. In the room, it will be more questions of disposition and of furniture. The height of the bed and its position in the room are very important.

    Finally, throughout the house, make sure to facilitate movement and access to windows and doors by eliminating unnecessary obstacles (pedestal tables, flower pots,). We will ban the electric wires and the extensions will fix the carpets... I once again thank you for this great work. Keep up the same work in future also. I am eagerly waiting for your upcoming post. I have already bookmarked this site. And I am going to share this site with my friends. Have a great day! Enjoy!

    Veronica Segura
    Visit my site: Cheap essay service

    ReplyDelete
  3. Very good - I'm having trouble with my elderly parents as they keep refusing help! Eventually we have managed to get carers to visit every morning and night and it seems to be working well...

    ReplyDelete
  4. When we had to have my mother in law come to us, we had to make sure there wasnt any rugs, because she shuffled, we had to think ahead and make sure there was no danger spots, and we even changed the tiles in the bathroom to non slip, there are some great tips here, thank you

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great tips thank you

    ReplyDelete
  6. Some great tips here and things I would not have thought of.

    ReplyDelete
  7. well first of all i would like to thank that you changed my thought its really wonderful great work done

    ReplyDelete

* This post may be a review or content collaboration